Teen Challenge New England | More Than #EndTheStigma
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More Than #EndTheStigma

More Than #EndTheStigma

It is unquestionable that America is in grave danger of continuing to lose thousands of its citizens because of the drug epidcompassion-01emic. Whether you believe that it is a disease or a choice that is a topic for another blog. Rather I want to discuss how to respond effectively if we want to win the fight and save lives. If you are indifferent or not interested in drug addiction, I would plead with you to take five minutes to read the article and be open to a perspective that might change your mind.
As a former drug addict the stigma bothered me, knowing that I was labeled a heroin/crack cocaine addict, it made me uncomfortable, which was a source of motivation to make a change. But it’s not so much the stigma/label that is wrong with today’s view, as it is the hatred or indifference that fuels the human heart. I am astonished at the people in comment sections on news outlets, new videos that surface when the onlookers are not trying to help but are gawking, mocking, and using it as a platform to get likes and to make a video go viral. This is the kind of response that makes me sick to my stomach and wonder what happened to an America that was willing to help their neighbor.
By no means am I making excuses for the one that is addicted, I believe; it is a personal decision to use drugs or to not use drugs. If America wants to win this fight against addiction then it’s going to happen by us (those who are pro-active, indifferent, even hate addiction) compassionately asking addicts to change their lives and to show them the people they are hurting. Love has to make its stand against something that is so destructive, so evil, that it could possibly wipe out an entire country one family member at a time.
If you are proactive in this fight, I ask that you would use wisdom when talking with people who are either indifferent or hate addicts. You don’t know if this person has been hurt, robbed, or even a family member has been killed by a drug addict in their search to get high. An understanding heart goes a long way in persuading people who don’t understand the depth of addiction and how much you might love someone who is addicted.
If you are indifferent or hate the addicts that you have seen or know, I would ask that you consider that there is someone out there who loves that person. That person is a son, daughter, wife, husband, mother, or father and though they might not be nice and could be the nastiest person in the world, I ask that you see them as valuable human life. More importantly, I would ask you to see a person who has potential to change, a person who is suffering internally with death every day.
God give us the grace to fight and take our neighborhoods back, our loved ones back, and our country back.